Saturday, September 15, 2012

Texts: Sun Star


May 19, 2000, Sun Star, CHR confirms violations vs women non combatant,
May 31, 2000, Sun Star, Lumads offered P10 000 to join MILF combatants,
July 16, 2000, Sun Star, Mindanaoans not supporting MILF s call for jihad de Guzman,
September 22, 2000, Sun Star, Baracatan not bombed just fired with rockets,
September 24, 2000, Sun Star, Murder raps filed vs MILF leaders,
September 24, 2000, Sun Star, Shoreline residents urged to look out for Abu bandits,
September 25, 2000, Sun Star, Baracatan village chief pushes for more Cafgus,
October 1, 2000, Sun Star Davao, 1 300 MILF men find refuge in Region 11,
October 1, 2000, Sun Star Davao, 10 killed 8 hurt in Panaga ambush,
October 3, 2000, Sun Star Davao, De Guzman condemns killing of civilians,
October 6, 2000, Sun Star Davao, War in Mindanao soon to end Erap,
October 7, 2000, Sun Star Davao, 10 000 new Cafgus to be deployed soon,
October 7, 2000, Sun Star Davao, Cotabato gov blames MILF for kidnappings,
October 7, 2000, Sun Star Davao, NDF SM apologizes for Panaga ambush,
October 8, 2000, Sun Star Davao, AFP s dare on Bayan to condemn NPA on ambush a childish ploy,
October 9, 2000, Sun Star Davao, 3 communist rebels killed in Zambo Sur,
October 9, 2000, Sun Star Davao, Air seaports alerted to fleeing Sayyaf rebels,
October 11, 2000, Sun Star, Armed men attack coco farm 3 dead,
October 16, 2000, Sun Star Zamboanga, 2 rebel leaders killed,
October 17, 2000, Sun Star Zamboanga, 1 Sayyaf bandits yield to military,
October 18, 2000, Sun Star, MILF to hold separate talks with OIC mission,
October 18, 2000, Sun Star, MNLF ready to abandon peace process Misuari warns,
October 22, 2000, Sun Star Zamboanga, Zamboanga 3 MILFs killed 5 cops hurt in fresh fighting,
October 22, 2000, Sun Star Zamboanga, Zamboanga Grenade throwing mars OIC team s visit to Basilan,
October 25, 2000, Sun Star Zamboanga, Military reduces troopers in Sulu,
October 26, 2000, Sun Star GenSan, MILF issues first Jihad communiqué,
October 27, 2000, Sun Star Davao, Rescued Malaysians presented to Erap,
October 30, 2000, Sun Star Zamboanga, AFP ups security in Zambo highway,
October 30, 2000, Sun Star Zamboanga, MILF extorts food from villages military,
October 30, 2000, Sun Star Zamboanga, MILF fabricating explosive military,


January 9, 2001, Sun Star Davao, MILF prepares for war, by Allan Nawal,
January 14, 2001, Sun Star Davao, MILF bombers now out of Davao City Garcia, by Ben O. Tesiorna,
January 17, 2001, Sun Star Davao, MILF main base still Camp Abubakar Kabalu, by Ben O. Tesiorna,
January 18, 2001, Sun Star Davao, UN vows to help MNLF surrenderees, by Ben O. Tesiorna,
January 24, 2001, Sun Star, MILF welcomes Arroyo to call off jihad, by Ben O. Tesiorna,
January 24, 2001, Sun Star Davao, MILF welcomes GMA admin wants peace talks resumed,
January 29, 2001, Sun Star, MILF attacks Lanao villagers 3 dead 5 hurt,
January 30, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Military figured in 3 clashes with MILF,
January 31, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Soldier 10 Sayyafs die in Jolo clash,
February 8, 2001, Sun Star Davao, MILF forges alliance with criminals army, by Allan Nawal,
February 9, 2001, Sun Star Davao, MILF will never associate with criminals Kabalu, by Ben O. Tesiorna,
February 13, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Military clashes anew with rebels in Dav Or, by Ben O. Tesiorna,
February 15, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Military helicopter hit by Muslim insurgents gunfire, Bong Garcia
March 12, 2001, Sun Star GenSan, Army welcomes peace talks with NDF,
March 14, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Additional troops requested to help pursue the Abu Sayaff,
March 14, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Garcia sees bright prospects for SM s tourism this year, Oibone Enobio,
March 15, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Suspected MILF bomber charged,
March 15, 2001, Sun Star Davao, GMA visits in Mindanao boosts tourism, by Oibone C. Enobio,
March 15, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Military Sayyaf clash anew 3 killed, by Bong Garcia,
March 21, 2001, Sun Star, 7 die in ComVal DavSur clashes, by Bong Garcia,
March 21, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Mindanao not among tourism priority areas,
March 23, 2001, Sun Star Cagayan, Pursue aggressive tourism drive to bring good image,
March 28, 2001, The Manila Times, Gloria confirms MILF deal, by Joel San Juan, and Al Omar Arafath,
March 29, 2001, Sun Star Cagayan, NPA purge victims dug up in MisOr town, by Joey P. Nacalaban,
March 29, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, No truce violations yet vs MILF says military,
April 4, 2011, Sun Star, No secret deals forged in Malaysia GMA, by She Caguimbal-Torres,
April 4, 2011, Sun Star Davao, Tourism agency drums up interest for region, by Oibone C. Enobio,
April 5, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Military renewed offensive vs Abu starts, by Bong Garcia,
April 5, 2001, Sun Star Davao, AFP NPA clash anew in DavOr, by Ben O. Tesiorna,
April 6, 2001, Sun Star, Abu cancels plan to behead Schilling,
April 6, 2001, Sun Star Cagayan, NPA set to attack on Holy Week PNP, by Lito M. Rulona,
April 24, 2001, Sun Star Gensan, Evacuees refuse to return home, by Danilo A. Reyes,
April 26, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, 14 militiamen die in clash with Abu, by Bong Garcia,
April 26, 2001, Sun Star Davao SouthMin s newest tourism attraction,
April 27, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, 6 Sayyafs 4 CVOs die in new clashes, by Bong Garcia,
April 27, 2001, Sun Star, GMA drops by Mactan welcomes back MILF head, by Elias O. Baquero.
May 28, 2001, Sun Star, 20 tourists seized from Palawan resort,
May 28, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Abduction over in 15 minutes, by Bong Garcia,
May 28, 2001, AP Daily Mail, Raid came as a surprise; Americans among those kidnapped at luxury resort,
May 28, 2001, AP / Lubbock Avalanche-J., Darkness suspends search for hostages, masked kidnappers,
May 29, 2001, Sun Star, Sayyaf owns abduction of 20 tourists,
May 29, 2001, The Manila Times, Bayan Muna condemns killing of supporter, by Greg G. Deligero,
May 29 2001, The Manila Times, Christian settlers raid Muslim town, by Maritess Fernandez,
May 30, 2001, Sun Star Abu threatens mass killing of hostages, by Bong Garcia and Joshua Dancel,
May 30, 2001 Sun Star Zamboanga, Sayyaf not yet in Basilan Sulu military,
June 5, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Abu Sayyaf regroups, by Bong Garcia,
June 6, 2001, Sun Star, Basilan guv favors state of emergency, by Jonathan Fernandez,
June 6, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Officials oppose state of emergency, by Bong Garcia,
June 11, 2001, AFP / Sun Star, Abu Sayyaf burns church seizes more hostages,
June 11, 2001, Sun Star Davao, MNLF clash with Sayyaf bandits,
June 11, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Mini Marshall plan for Sulu Basilan bared,
June 14, 2001, Sun Star, Sayyafs a curse to Islam GMA,
June 19, 2001, Sun Star Davao, 1 500 MNLFs storm Armm compound, Ben O. Tesiorna and Peng Aliño,
June 19, 2001, Sun Star, GMA vows no let up in war vs Sayyafs,
June 19, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Human rights abuses thrive where military police are,
June 25, 2001, Sun Star, Sobero is still alive MILF.txt
June 26, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Number of displaced families continue to soar, by Bong Garcia,
June 26, 2001,Sun Star Davao, Peace pact lauded,
June 26, 2001, Sun Star, Soldier 4 Sayyafs wounded in clash.
June 29, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Indigenous people want separate state, by Allan Nawal,
June 29, 2001, Sun Star, MILF s presence delay attack on Abu,





May 28, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Abduction over in 15 minutes, by Bong Garcia,

ZAMBOANGA -- It just took 15 minutes for heavily armed men, wearing bonnet mask, to round up 23 people, including foreigners, from Dos Palmas resort off Palawan Sunday morning. Three of them, namely, Manuelita Pondia, Peter Largo and Isagani fortunado, were out-rightly freed, reducing the number of hostages to 20 that includes three Americans, 14 Chinese-Filipinos and three resort workers.

The gunmen, numbering about 24, swooped down at around 5:30 a.m. Sunday on Dos Palmas Beach Resort and grabbed the victims from the nine floating cottages. The victims were herded towards two green-colored and white-striped speedboats and fled towards south to Mindanao. The speedboats were reportedly powered by three engines with 250 horsepower each.

They were monitored three hours ago at Espaniola point, 80 miles off Palawan," said Army Lt. Col. Danilo Servando, spokesman of the Armed Forces Southern Command (Southcom). Although Palawan is not within the area of the Armed Forces Southern Command, the military here, in coordination with the Southwestern Command (Sowescom), is closely monitoring the abductors' movement.

Servando said patrol gunboats from the Naval Task Force 71 were immediately mobilized to track down the gunmen and the victims. Helicopter gun-ships were also dispatched for aerial surveillance. However, the military could not say whether the abductors are Abu Sayyaf bandits despite reports that the suspects, along with the captives, are heading toward south or to the direction of Sulu.

The Abu Sayyaf bandits gained international notoriety when they seized 21 people, mostly foreigners on April 23 last year from a resort in Sipadan, Sabah. The separatist Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), through its spokesman Eid Kabalu, has denied involvement in the latest mass abduction.



May 28, 2001, Sun Star, 20 tourists seized from Palawan resort,

ZAMBOANGA -- It only took 15 minutes for heavily armed men, wearing bonnet masks, to round up 23 people, including foreigners, from the Dos Palmas resort off Palawan Sunday morning. Three of them, namely, Manuelita Pondia, Peter Largo and Isagani Fortunado, were freed outright, reducing the number of hostages to 20 that includes three Americans, a Spaniard, 13 Chinese-Filipinos and three resort workers.

The gunmen, numbering about 24, swooped down at around 5:30 a.m. Sunday on the Dos Palmas resort on the tiny rock of Arreceffi off Palawan island and grabbed the victims from the nine floating cottages. The victims were herded towards two green-colored and white-striped speedboats, which fled towards south to Mindanao. The speedboats were reportedly powered by three engines with 250 horsepower each.

A spokesman of the resort, Allan Fabian, told ABS-CBN that the raiders ransacked the bay area of the resort where some cottages were located. Within 15 minutes, the armed suspects abducted two Americans, one Spaniard, 13 Filipino-Chinese tourists and four resort personnel. Military intelligence sources named the foreign victims as Americans Martin Burham and his wife Gracia, and Guillermo Zobero of Spain. There were about 100 guests during the time of the raid but mostly billeted at the resort's mainland area, which was not penetrated by the suspects, said Fabian.

Sighting

The hostages were immediately whisked by the Tausug-speaking abductors, as alleged by the witnesses, to a speedboat but later transferred to a bigger motorboat locally known as kumpit. The large boat was later found abandoned in Batarasa, a coastal town in the southern tip of Palawan but there was no immediate news as to what happened to the kidnappers and their hostages.

Palawan Gov. Joel Reyes said he was trying to get private helicopters to volunteer to help in tracking the kidnapers as the pursuing military aircraft was already running out of fuel. Later on Sunday, the kidnappers and their hostages were monitored at Espaniola point, 80 miles off Palawan, said Army Lt. Col. Danilo Servando, AFP Southern Command spokesman.

With the sighting of the kidnappers, Presidential spokesman Rigoberto Tiglao expressed confidence that the victims, including three Americans, would soon be rescued. He added that President Arroyo has dispatched AFP Chief of Staff Diomedio Villanueva to Puerto Princesa to lead the rescue efforts.

General Villanueva is in Puerto Princesa as we speak. He says that the kidnapping band has been sighted, and is very confident that the kidnappers could be encircled and hostages released," Tiglao told ABS-CBN television.

Monitoring

Although Palawan is not within the SouthCom area, the military in Zamboanga, in coordination with the Southwestern Command (Sowescom), is closely monitoring the abductors' movement. Servando said patrol gunboats from the Naval Task Force 71 were immediately mobilized to track down the gunmen and the victims. Helicopter gun-ships were also dispatched for aerial surveillance.

However, the military could not say if the abductors are Abu Sayyaf bandits despite reports that the suspects, along with the captives, are headed towards south or in the direction of Sulu. The Abu Sayyaf bandits gained international notoriety when they seized 21 people, mostly foreigners on April 23 last year from a resort in Sipadan, Sabah.

Policemen investigating the abduction said the gunmen kicked down doors, rifled through closets and emptied refrigerators before taking off with 20 hostages. The found the doors apparently forced open, guest rooms in disarray, and open fridges after the dawn raid, Inspector Rodolfo Amurao said. "Clothes were strewn around the rooms," Amurao said. But police could not give an inventory of the missing items because the hotel guests were also missing.

Amurai said it looked like the kidnappers also took food from the refrigerators. The Lim family in Davao owns the Dos Palmas resort. Contacted for comment, a member of the family refused to say anything beyond admitting that the place is indeed owned by the Lims and an uncle manages the resort.

No ransom

National Security Adviser Roilo Golez said over radio dxRP that the suspects were last monitored to be moving 220 degrees towards the direction of Malaysia. But he did not confirm, however, if the suspects were already out of Philippine waters. Golez said the hostage takers have not yet demanded any ransom, reiterating that the National Government will stand by its "no ransom, no negotiation policy."

Tiglao also stressed that the government would not negotiate with the gunmen. "Our policy stands, there will be no negotiations for any kind of ransom." Asked about reports that the raiders are members of the Abu Sayyaf, an Islamic guerrilla group who went on a kidnapping spree in Malaysia last year, Tiglao said: "That is one report that we received.

"One report we received is that because of the (military) operation in Basilan or Sulu (island groups where the Abu Sayyaf operates), the Abu Sayyaf has broken up in so many splinter groups. "But we don't have any strong confirmation as yet if these are Abu Sayyaf."

Radio and television reports alleged the suspects were members of the terrorist group Abu Sayyaf. Golez, however, said the identities of the suspects were yet to be determined and appealed to the media not to speculate.

Connection

On the possible connection between the Barcelo Pearl Farm Island Resort attack and the recent Palawan abduction, Golez said they have not established such a connection. "Wala pang koneksyon yan dahil yung nangyari sa Pearl Farm ay posibleng gawa ng MILF na nag-eextort sa management," he said. (The connection is not yet established since the Pearl Farm attackers could be members of the MILF who tried to extort some amount from the management.)

Earlier, Moro Islamic Liberation Front spokesperson Eid Kabalu denied any involvement in the Pearl Farm attack, saying they are still implementing a suspension of military action. He also denied that the MILF had a hand in the most recent attack on the Dos Palmas resort. Golez admitted the recent incident is a big blow to the tourism industry of the country.

"To be honest about it, di makakatulong ito sa ating turismo. At ang ating national government ay umaaksyon na dito ngayon (The recent abductions didn't help the country's tourism. The national government is already taking necessary actions)," he said. Golez said that the boat being used by the kidnappers was overloaded and could not move very quickly.

Police in the Palawan capital of Puerto Princesa, meanwhile, said they had found two local fishermen who had been forced to direct the kidnappers to the resort in Palawan where the hostages were taken. Supt. Orlando Madela, police spokesman, said the two fishermen, whose identities were being withheld while in police custody, were seized by the kidnappers while fishing in a small boat off Palawan.

They were forced to direct the kidnappers to the Dos Palmas resort and were then set free but were warned not to tell the police or they would be killed. However, after the kidnapping, when more police arrived at the scene, the fishermen went to them to report what happened, Madela said.(Sunnex/wires)



May 28, 2001, AP / Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, Darkness suspends search for hostages, masked kidnappers,

MANILA, Philippines {AP}— The Philippine military took to the air and sea in search of two dozen gunmen who raided an upscale resort wearing ski masks Sunday and then fled by boat with about 20 hostages, including three American tourists.

As darkness fell, the airplanes were recalled and fears were growing of a repeat of the prolonged hostage crisis last year that received worldwide attention and battered the Philippines' international image.

After storming the Dos Palmas Island Resort at dawn, the kidnappers headed south, either toward islands that are home to Muslim extremists who seized foreigners 13 months ago or toward Malaysia, which offered the Philippines its cooperation in the matter.

President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo dispatched her military chief of staff, Diomedio Villanueva, to direct the search-and-rescue effort from Palawan Island, a short boat ride from the resort, and ships and planes fanned out over the Mindanao Sea.

Villanueva said officials believed they knew who the kidnappers were, but he would not identify them.

Speculation has focused on Abu Sayyaf, the Islamic rebel group that raided a Malaysian tourist resort and took 10 foreign tourists hostage on April 23, 2000. All those hostages have since been freed, some reportedly for large ransoms paid by Libya.

Arroyo ordered "all-out war" on Abu Sayyaf in early April, but military officials said the separatist organization has regrouped in the last two weeks. Still, Tourism Secretary Richard Gordon tried to downplay suggestions that the Abu Sayyaf was responsible for Sunday's raid.

There were concerns for the hostages' safety if a showdown developed, said Arroyo's spokesman, Rigoberto Tiglao. He vowed there would be no negotiations or ransom.

The kidnappings took place at the Dos Palmas resort at Honda Bay in Palawan province, about 375 miles southwest of Manila.

Military officials said two dozen men in ski masks took guests and resort staffers at gunpoint in a raid that lasted about 15 minutes. The guests were believed to include 13 Chinese Filipinos, three Americans and at least one child.

Two of the Americans were identified as Martin and Gracia Burnham, missionaries from Wichita, Kan., who have lived in the Philippines since 1986 and have been working for the New Tribes Mission of Sanford, Fla., said Tim Grossman, who was at the organization's Manila office Sunday.

The couple flew to the resort on Saturday for their 18th wedding anniversary. Their three children — Jeffrey, 14, Melinda, 11, and Zachary, 10 — are also in the Philippines.

Martin Burnham's mother said from Rose Hill, Kan., that she does not believe a ransom should be paid because that could encourage more kidnappings.

"You could go to Wichita or New York and get mugged, or something like that. We don't feel at all in danger, and our children feel the same way," Oreta Burnham said.

The other American was identified as Guillermo Sobero, of Corona, Calif., who was to mark his 40th birthday on Tuesday.

In Corona, a woman who identified herself as his wife, Fanny Sobero, said she learned about the kidnappings from a reporter's phone call. The couple is in the midst of a divorce.



May 28, 2001, AP / Charleston Daily Mail, Raid came as a surprise: ; Americans among those kidnapped at luxury resort,

ARRECIFFE ISLAND, Philippines - The swift raid hardly disturbed the dawn quiet at the luxury resort: only the hum of the approaching boat, the crash of a toppled flowerpot as the attackers climbed the dock, the clatter of guns as guards put up their hands. Within a half-hour, 20 captives were whisked away, starting another Philippine hostage saga.

Witnesses said surprise and efficiency were the hallmarks of Sunday's raid on the plush Dos Palmas Tourist Resort off Palawan Island.

"I didn't even think there was a problem," said George Cervencia, a resort pilot who vaguely recalls awakening to some stirrings and glancing toward the noise. "I thought it was a visit from some soldiers."

The Muslim separatist Abu Sayyaf movement today claimed responsibility for the kidnapping and said it had eluded a massive cordon to reach two islands in the southern Philippines where they held their captives, including three Americans.

The 24 sea-borne raiders, disguised as troops, drifted to the resort's dock to a welcome by two unsuspecting guards. Other armed security men, watching from a treetop lookout 200 yards away, saw nothing unusual as the raiders surreptitiously pointed rifles and whispered threats, evoking the guards' silent surrender.

The men swiftly moved into position outside most of the 10 cottages on stilts where tourists slept over the bay's azure waters. Resort manager Allan Fabian said they chose only the units with air- conditioners running, a sign they were occupied.

A volley of booted kicks bashed open the doors. A rifle butt shattered a window. The vacationers inside, still sleeping off a day of snorkeling, paddling and fishing, awoke to hushed commands at gunpoint.

Less than 25 minutes after their stealthy landing, the attackers had rounded up 23 tourists and resort staffers and bundled them aboard a covered speedboat. Fabian said some were roughed up a little if they resisted.

Worried about their sagging waterline, the gunmen shoved three resort cooks back on shore, turned on one of their engines and headed south with their captives. They included three Americans and two children, whose mother was not taken and awaited news anxiously today at the resort.

Fabian, who has interviewed all of the guests and staffers who remained, said the resort's accountant, who hid in her beach hut as the attackers smashed her window for a glance inside, sounded the alarm as the sound of engine faded into the distance.

Within 20 minutes, the police and military were scrambling to put helicopters and reconnaissance planes into the air. The tropical sun already had illuminated the dozens of palm-fringed islands, coral reefs, sandbars, fishing boats and ferries in the Mindanao Sea.

Fabian said the attackers used maps and compasses to reach the vicinity of the island, then abducted two fishermen and forced them to serve as guides to the resort. The fishermen were forced off at Dos Palmas to make room for the hostages.

The Abu Sayyaf guerrilla group kidnapped 10 foreign tourists and 11 workers from a Malaysian resort 13 months ago.

Today, only 39 of the resort's 113 guests remained. Police in brown fatigues, wielding assault rifles from the shadows of the coconut palms, watched as a few children splashed around in brightly colored plastic canoes above a group of black-tipped sharks.



May 28, 2001, The Manila Times, Palace rules out talks with bandits, by Joel R. San Juan, Reporter; Artemio Dumlao, Correspondent,

PRESIDENT Macapagal-Arroyo yesterday ordered the armed forces to ensure the immediate release of the 21 Filipino and foreign tourists abducted from a resort in Puerto Princesa, Palawan, as she maintained that the government would not pay any ransom or entertain any demand from the kidnappers.

Mrs. Macapagal-Arroyo, likewise, ordered the military to secure all tourist spots in the Visayas and southern islands of the Philippines to prevent similar kidnapping incidents, acknowledging that the series of raids in little more than a week have done great damage to the government’s efforts to promote tourism.

In Baguio City, Sen. Loren Legarda-Leviste expressed fears that the new hostage-taking incident could further erode the country’s image in the international community.

Legarda and Tourism Secretary Richard Gordon expressed hope that local and foreign media would not sensationalize the new rash of abductions.

The senator urged the government to crush the kidnappers but also cited the need to safeguard the hostages.

Gordon said it is important to throw a protective cover around the country’s top tourism drawers.

Personal supervision

At a press briefing, Presidential Spokesperson Rigoberto Tiglao said Mrs. Arroyo ordered AFP Chief of Staff Gen. Diomedia Villanueva to personally supervise the pursuit operation against the bandits.

“The President condemns this dastardly criminal act of desperate, ruthless, bandits. They seemed to have taken advantage of the fact that police and military forces have been deployed to ensure that election-related violence will be reduced and to ensure that votes are properly counted,” Tiglao said.

Tiglao added that the Chief Executive also assured the families of the hostages that the government will do everything within its powers to ensure the safe rescue of their loved ones.

Because of the incident, the President is also likely to excuse herself from attending the much-talked wedding today of movie personalities Charlene Gonzales and Aga Muhlach at St. Joseph the Worker Church, Baguio City.

AFP spokesperson Brig. Gen. Edilberto Adan told Mala-cañang reporters Villanueva is now in the area to supervise the operations of the AFP Western Command.

Tiglao said Malacañang has yet to receive the reaction from the United States government.

‘Generic’ terrorists

Adan said officials could not pin blame yet on the Abu Sayyaf.

“The Abu Sayyaf term has been loosely used latterly because of the Sipadan Island hostage incident last year,” he pointed out.

“The Abu Sayyaf has become generic…So we cannot say this is Abu Sayyaf, this could be splinter terrorist groups whose appetite were whetted because of the last year’s ransom payments,” he added.

“That’s why the government is reiterating its no-ransom policy because it simply encourages other lawless groups to take advantage of that situation,” Adan stressed.

Adan also maintained that the Palawan kidnapping was not connected to the Davao Pearl Farm and Basilan incident.

National Security Adviser Roilo Golez said the involvement of the Abu Sayyaf in the said kidnapping was remote since Palawan is too far from where the group is based.

“Any group could be pinpointed at this time, but our main description of the group responsible to the abduction is armed bandits. The area is too far for the Abu Sayyaf to be immediately considered,” Golez added.

Cooperation

Tiglao said the Malaysian government had also stepped up its border patrol after the Philippine government informed them of the possibility that the kidnappers would try to enter in their territory.

“The Malaysian authorities had been notified and the Malaysian navy is now stepping up its border patrol,” he said.

Adan said a joint task force of the Philippine Navy, the army and the air force, including elements from outside the Western Command, has been mobilized to track down the kidnappers and their hostages.

“The most important thing here in this type of operation is to be able to detect the craft, the transportation used. This is easily done by air, so we have to do this while there is still daylight and the most important aircraft that we could use here are the helicopters and the fixed wing rotary aircraft the air force has in its inventory,” Adan noted.

Appeals

Gordon cautioned the press to be extra sensitive when reporting about the Philippines in the international community.

Legarda echoed the appeal, saying: “Let us make the international community that what is happening in an area like in that kidnapping scenario will not necessarily affect the rest of the country.”

She asked the police and the military to be stricter and improve intelligence gathering efforts to thwart future assaults.

The PNP should really beef up their intelligence operations, she stressed.

Legarda is a member of the Senate defense committee.



May 29, 2001, The Manila Times, Bayan Muna condemns killing of supporter, by Greg G. Deligero, Mindanao News Bureau,

The militant party-list group Bayan Muna has condemned the killing of one of its woman municipal convenors in Compostela Valley province who led a peasants’ group that has been at odds with the military.

Bayan Muna ComVal chair Romualdo Basilio has asked for the speedy investigation of the murder of Elena Gonzales, who was killed around 8 p.m. last March 20 by three unidentified heavily-armed men at her house in Mangayon, Compostela.

Gonzales, 46, was also a known supporter of re-electionist board member Reynaldo de Castillo.

“We are concerned that her murder might trigger more bloody events that would spur more human rights abuses during the election season,” he said.

Gonzales was a peasant rights advocate who prominently figured in the struggle of farmers against the local detachment of the army’s 60th Infantry Battalion.

“The military (unit) was responsible for various atrocities in the course of its counter-insurgency operations. Mauling, torture, arson and other human rights violations were reported by human rights groups as having been perpetuated by military and paramilitary groups in the area,” Basilio said.

He described Gonzales as an “avid supporter of peasant issues in the locality.”

The victim was buried yesterday afternoon in Golden Valley Cemetery, Montevista town.

Southern Mindanao police spokesman Sr. Insp. Matthew Baccay said reports reaching them were not yet clear whether Gonzales’ killing was politically motivated.

“We are still waiting for the official report on the killing. It is very early to conclude,” Baccay told THE MANILA TIMES

Joel Virador, secretary-general of the human rights group Karapatan, said the case of Gonzales is not isolated, citing similar cases in other parts of the region involving leaders of peasants groups supporting Bayan Muna who were harassed by the military.

Earlier this month, a Bayan Muna coordinator in Barangay Suwawan, Davao City was also arrested by elements of the army’s 73rd Infantry Batallion for being a suspected member of the New People’s Army reportedly conducting “mass-based organizing work.



May 29 2001, The Manila Times, Christian settlers raid Muslim town, by Maritess Fernandez, Mindanao News Bureau,

ZAMBOANGA CITY—Angry Christian settlers, armed with automatic weapons, attacked a Muslim village in Kabacan town, North Cotabato Saturday night, a military spokesman said yesterday.

The attack, said Col. Fredesvindo Covarrubias of the Southern Command based here, was apparently in retaliation barely a week after suspected Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) rebels raided Barangay Malamote in Matalam town, also in North Cotabato, kil-ling and wounding several Christian farmers.

According to Covarrubias, the attack, which lasted more than 10 minutes, was launched by Christians, who were wearing hoods and masks.

He said the Christians fired their automatic rifles and shotguns indiscriminately on a row of houses in a predominantly Muslim village in Kabacan.

The military officer did not say if there were casualties in the attack which is believed to be in retaliation to an earlier raid by suspected MILF guerrillas in Matalam.

The rebels also blasted a house of a Christian leader with a B-40 anti-tank rocket, killing the owner and seriously wounding his wife and son, Covarrubias said.

The attack on Malamote village could trigger a violent retaliation by militants against Christian settlements in the largely Muslim province, where MILF forces are known to operate, observers say.

But Covarrubias said troops were deployed in the town earlier this week to prevent the escalation of hostilities between Christians and Muslims.

“There could be a group behind these incidents, which is trying to ignite a rift or dissension between the Christians and the Muslims, who are peacefully co-existing in the province,” Covarrubias said without elaborating.

Separatist rebels have targeted Christian farmers living in Central Mindanao. Many were killed in the spate of rebel attacks since early this year.

Last year, guerrillas bombed the Our Lady of Mediatrix barge near the predominantly Muslim province of Lanao del Norte, killing dozens of passengers



June 5, 2001, Inquirer News Service, Bandits rode slow boat to Basilan, say fishermen, by Geraldford P. Ticke and Jofelle Tesorio.
Posted: 0:40 AM (Manila Time)

PUERTO PRINCESA CITY -- Contrary to statements by the Armed Forces, no military cordon or blockade was put up to prevent the escape of the Abu Sayyaf bandits that abducted 20 guests and employees of the Dos Palmas resort here on May 27.

Julian Rayla, captain of the MB June II carrying 10 fishermen whom the bandits also took hostage in the course of fleeing government forces, made this allegation in a press conference late yesterday.

Rayla said the bandits intercepted them that Sunday near San Miguel Island in Cagayan de Sulu, about 20-30 miles north of Mapun Island in Tawi-Tawi.

He said the whole group sailed for Basilan late the next day and kept moving for two days and two nights.

All 10 fishermen, including Rayla, were released by their captors in the mountains of Basilan on June 2. Traveling in an Air Force Nomad plane and a Navy Islander, they arrived home here the next day.

Rear Adm. Rodolfo Rabago, chief of the Western Command, and Brig. Gen. Felipe Gaerlan, commander of the 570th Composite Tactical Wing, presented Rayla and his companions--Roland Rayla, Celso Cabigao, Baldones Gonzaga, Romulo, Henry and Romeo Ollabe, Rodolfo Campos and Reynaldo and Anias Conales--to the media.

After being shown pictures of the bandits, Rayla identified Abu Sayyaf spokesperson Abu Sabaya as the leader of the group.

This was how Rayla narrated their weeklong ordeal:

Early on May 27 the fishermen learned from radio reports that the Abu Sayyaf had attacked the Dos Palmas resort, and even anticipated that the bandits’ kumpit (speedboat) would head in their direction.

True enough, the bandits stopped near their fishing boat about 1 p.m. and asked if they could take some of the passengers in the kumpit. Seven armed men then got on board.

Sabaya was wearing camouflage pants and a black long-sleeved shirt.

After a while, the kumpit ran out of fuel and all of its passengers transferred to the fishing boat.

Bandits and hostages reached Kinapusan Island in Cagayan de Tawi-Tawi and stayed there awhile. They left the island around 10 p.m. on May 28, and reached Basilan on May 31.

1 small plane

Rayla said that during the long journey, sailing at a speed of about eight knots, the group saw only a single small airplane.

"We cooked for (the bandits) and for the hostages. We gave them food because if not, our lives would have been in danger. The Abu Sayyaf seemed happy with our presence because they had food to eat," he said in Filipino.

Rayla said he spoke with some of the Dos Palmas hostages.

"I asked them if they were treated well, and the hostages said yes. We agreed that if we came out safe from this kidnapping, we would have a reunion in Palawan," he said.

Reynaldo Conales said the two American missionaries, Martin and Gracia Burnham, prayed and sang quietly in a corner of the boat.

According to the fishermen, Sabaya and another bandit leader were always calling someone on a cell phone.

Rayla said that when Sabaya called a radio station in Zamboanga City and announced that the hostages had been taken to Basilan and Sulu, the group was still in Cagayan de Tawi-Tawi.

He said Sabaya only wanted to mislead the military.

Rayla said Sabaya had told them that they would be set free if the group reached Basilan safely.

Upon arrival in Basilan, the bandits sank the MB June II. Then the group trekked to the mountains and stayed there for two days.

"We were tied to a big tree in a place called Batu-bato before the Abu Sayyaf and the hostages went down on board a jeep to Lamitan. Later on, some civilian residents rescued us,” Rayla said.
Grief

But while the fishermen's families are joyful, the families of Dos Palmas security guard Reynaldo Bayona and kitchen staff Sonny Daquer, who were both executed by the Abu Sayyaf, are overwhelmed with grief.

They are hoping against hope that the corpses found in Lamitan, Basilan, are not those of their loved ones.

"I cannot accept that my son is dead," said Armando's mother Lolita in between sobs.

But Armando's brother Paquito said he was not surprised at what had happened.

"I told my parents that only two people will be sacrificed by the Abu Sayyaf after the President's announcement that there will be no ransom and no negotiation,” he said in Filipino. “Now my fear has come true.”

Paquito appealed to the government to intensify operations against the bandits.

"I just hope government troops will wipe out these bandits after what they did to my brother and Sonny. If not, many people will be killed and they will do it again and again," he said.

Francisco Bayona has accepted his son's fate. "We cannot do anything. Let's just put this in God's hands," he said.

Armando was to turn 29 on June 15. He was to marry his girlfriend, Cecile Paduga, a fellow employee at Dos Palmas, this month.

Armando was one of the original security guards of Dos Palmas, where his romance with Cecile first bloomed.

Sonny Daquer's wife, Joveline (not Josephine, as earlier reported), is six months pregnant with their third child and inconsolable.

She recounted how excited Sonny was over their new baby. "He promised to work hard to support our growing family," she said.

Ben Daquer lamented that his brother was a victim and did not have anything to do with the bandits.



June 5, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Abu Sayyaf regroups, by Bong Garcia,

ZAMBOANGA -- The Abu Sayyaf who broke free from military cordon has reportedly re-grouped and massing its forces in the hinterlands of Tuburan, Basilan province, a top government official of the province said. Basilan Representative Abdulgani Salapuddin said an informant called him and said the Abu Sayyaf and their remaining hostages were seen in the vicinity of a secluded place of Bato-Bato, Tuburan, 20 kilometers away from Lamitan town.

"My informant told me that some villagers saw the Abu Sayyaf along with their hostages in Bato-Bato and I'm urging the military to investigate the report, "Salapuddin said. Bato-Bato is adjacent to barangay Bulanting of the same town where the initial clash between the government troopers and bandits took place shortly before 6 am Thursday.

Before the initial clash, the bandits have reportedly divided into three groups including the hostages. The first group stayed in Saluping island, the second proceeded to Canas and the third group to Sampinit mountain. Sampinit mountain serves as haven of lawless elements like the bandits as the place is covered with forest. It is situated in the center of Basilan province.

The bandits numbering to 60, occupied Saturday St. Peter Church and Jose Ma. Torres Memorial Hospital in Lamitan town and broke off the military cordon at nightfall dragging along with them the Palawan hostages and additional five hostages.

There are still 16 hostages, from a total of 30 that are in the hands of the bandits that includes 11 taken Sunday of last week from Dos Palmas Resort in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan. Nine of the 20 Palawan hostages were rescued at the height of the firefight with the military troops pursuing the bandits.

Salapuddin said Basilan Gov. Wahab Akbar should not blame the military for the escape of the Abu Sayyaf in Lamitan. "It is his responsibility to help the government in crisis that is not only affecting the province of Basilan but the entire country, "Salapuddin said. Instead, the governor should help the authorities by providing information and assistance in tracking down bandits to retrieve the hostages.

Akbar said over RMN-Zamboanga that military had chided him when he told them about the possibility that the bandits could escape from the Church and hospital. "Instead na tanungin kung may suggestion tayo, ang sabi pa nila sa akin, paano makatakas ang mga iyan naka-kordon ang lugar," Akbar said.

Commission on Human Rights regional director Jose Manuel Mamauag has strongly condemned the extremist Abu Sayyaf Group of using the innocent civilians as shields to elude the military cordon. It is sad to note that the civilians are being used as pawns by the Abu Sayyaf in their fight against the government," Mamauag said as he urged the bandits to free the hostages unconditionally.



June 6, 2001, Sun Star, Basilan guv favors state of emergency, by Jonathan Fernandez,

MANILA -- Basilan Gov. Wahab Akbar said Tuesday he is in favor of putting the entire province under a state of emergency provided there is a system to implement it. Akbar, who was in Manila Tuesday to iron out important matters regarding the telephone system in his province, also asked the Arroyo administration to first make a thorough study before a state of emergency in Basilan is declared to avoid any mistakes.

"The government should have a system in implementing a state of emergency in Basilan so that the innocent civilians would not suffer," Akbar said. The governor personally believes the Arroyo government should declare martial law as an immediate solution to the problem brought about by the presence of the Abu Sayyaf in Mindanao.

Akbar said the military needs extra powers in its fight against the bandits. President Arroyo is now studying the proposal to declare a state of emergency in Basilan on belief that such declaration would help wipe out the Abu Sayyaf Group. However, a Muslim leader residing in Salam Mosque, Barangay Culiat, Quezon City is opposed to such plan.

Hadji Nur Hassan said the state of emergency could worsen the problem with the Abu Sayyaf and make the innocent civilians suffer. Hassan said the declaration might only create additional foes against the government. In a related development, Gov. Akbar vehemently denied former Presidential Adviser Robert Aventajado had any participation in the alleged payment of a P10 million ransom for the release of one of the hostages, former Manila Times owner Reghis Romero. "That (ransom) is still unconfirmed. I'm only worrying; if that is true, the Abu Sayyaf will be able to buy more guns and bullets and even hire additional members because of that big amount of money," Akbar added. Aventajado, in a radio interview, also denied involvement in any alleged ransom payment. He admitted, though, that Romero's family had approached him for help in negotiating with the bandits. Aventajado said he turned them down.



June 6, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Officials oppose state of emergency, by Bong Garcia,

ZAMBOANGA -- Top local government officials of Basilan and of this city vehemently oppose to the plan of declaring a state of emergency to address the terrorism problem in the southern Philippines brought by the Abu Sayyaf bandits.

Basilan Congressman Abdylgani Salapuddin said the government should instead apply a commando-type operations in rescuing the 16 hostages and not to impose my measure that will tremendously affect the lives of the people.

"I strongly object to the declaration of the state of emergency or martial law because it is the ordinary people who will be displaced. What we need is honest to goodness campaigning against the Abu Sayyaf," Salappudin said. Salapuddin does not favor in employing large number of troopers to run after the bandits, a self-styled Islamic fighters.

He disclosed the military has already deployed more than five battalions of troops to run after the bandits. "It is not a question of mobilizing big number of troops, this will only cause the lives of several number of troops," Basilan congressman said. Zamboanga Mayor Maria Clara Lobregat said the national government should consult first with the concern government officials of the affected areas in the present crisis before declaring a state of emergency.

"They should not impose on their own. We have our leaders here to be consulted. Beside this will only cause more problem to our economy once they will implement such measure," Lobregat said. Basilan Gov. Wahib Akbar earlier suggested the imposition of state of emergency in his province following the flak received by the military cordon dragging along the hostages.

Akbar also charged the military for its ineffective strategy in flushing out the bandits. He also disclosed that the civilians had already lost its onfidence to the military due to its failure last Sunday. The bandits, numbering to 60 dragging along 16 hostages, managed to slip through the military cordon around St. Peter Church and Jose Ma. Torres Memorial Hospital in Lamitan and fled to nearby town of Tuburan at nightfall Sunday.

"Instead of sour-graping, he (Akbar) should extend his all out support to the military," Salapuddin said. Salapuddin disclosed that Akbar has an axe to grin on the military who has confiscated some firearms from the camp of the governor during the elections. The Basilan-based 103rd Army Infantry Brigade has confiscated seven high powered firearms from the provincial capital on May 15 during a clearing operations just before the Board of Canvassers started canvassing the electoral returns.



June 11, 2001, AFP / Sun Star, Abu Sayyaf burns church seizes more hostages,

LAMITAN -- Abu Sayyaf guerrillas holding 13 hostages including three Americans seized at least two new captives and burned a Christian church in a raid on the southern island of Basilan early Monday, police said.

The rebels raided the village of Pairan near Tuburan town and seized at least two unidentified hostages, Police Superintendent Achmadul Pangambayan told reporters, adding that one chapel was set on fire.

Radio Mindanao Network reported from Basilan that Abu Sayyaf gunmen raided a coconut plantation and seized at least one farm worker after a gunfight with the plantation's security guards.

Brigadier General Edilberto Adan, a military spokesman, said in Manila that he could not confirm the report. But he said such attacks could be described as "diversionary operations to split our forces" in Basilan.

Abu Sayyaf gunmen, who say they are fighting for an independent Islamic state, seized the three Americans and 17 other people from Dos Palmas resort on Arrecife island off Palawan on May 27 and took them to Basilan. Nine Filipino hostages escaped last Saturday amid a military offensive, including one man with a knife wound on the neck. But the gunmen executed two other Filipino captives and later seized two nurses, a midwife and a clerk from a hospital in Lamitan on Basilan. (AFP)



June 11, 2001, Sun Star Davao, MNLF clash with Sayyaf bandits,

JOLO, Sulu -- Members of the Moro National Liberation Front who have been integrated in the government's armed forces clashed with suspected members of the Abu Sayyaf in Bunot, Indanan Sunday around 10 am. No one was reported killed.

Two squads were attending funeral rites in Lampati, Indanan town when they received reports that suspected members of the Abu Sayyaf were seen in Bunot, some 300 meters away. The armed forces were on their way to the area when armed men engaged them in a firefight.

Reports said brothers Albadir and Lalung Parad, allegedly "commanders" of the Abu Sayyaf were seen hiding in a hut while eight others were waiting in another hut. The suspected bandits fled towards a known Abu Sayyaf lair -- Mt. Pukay, the second highest mountain south of Sulu -- as military reinforcements came.

Last Friday, two helicopter gun-ships bombed a mountainous area in Patikul and Talipao towns, following reports that Abu Sayyaf bandits were seen there. There are no civilians residing in the area but shrapnel hit one of two boys who were in the area to harvest some coconuts. The boy is now confined at the provincial hospital. Military officials declined to comment, citing the news blackout directive of President Arroyo.



June 11, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Mini Marshall plan for Sulu Basilan bared,

DAVAO -- Government is eyeing a multi-million peso 'mini-Marshall plan' to spur the development of Basilan, Sulu and Tawi-tawi in the next 10 years, Interior and Local Government Secretary Jose Lina, Jr. said. Lina said the plan is part of the government's "comprehensive approach" to solve the "Abu Sayyaf problem."

He said government must address poverty and underdevelopment as this situation helped give birth to bandit groups like the Abu Sayyaf. `There has to be a blitzkrieg (in addressing the Abu Sayyaf problem),' Lina told reporters during a recent visit here.

He said the projects funded by the plan are intended to have a "high impact" in terms of spurring the economic development of these areas. The Marshall Plan was a program of financial aid and other initiatives sponsored by the United States, to boost the economies of Western European countries following the second world war.

Lina said the circumferential road in Basilan should be completed to speed up the exchange of goods and reduce spoilage of agricultural products. Lina said they acknowledge that kidnapping and banditry in these areas will not be solved even if government succeeds in annihilating the Abu Sayyaf unless they address the problems of neglect, underdevelopment and poverty that drove residents in the area to criminality.

Government forces are pursuing the Abu Sayyaf following the abduction of 20 tourists and workers from the Dos Palmas resort in Palawan. Lina said the mini-Marshall plan will also include establishing more hospitals, school buildings and other projects essential for the development of these areas.

But Lina said he cannot as yet say how much money will be poured in as this will depend on the comprehensive plans drafted by provincial and municipal peace and order as well as the development councils of the local governments of the three provinces.

A mini-Marshall plan was also proposed last year for Basilan but it remained a plan. "We are not promising the needs will be funded immediately but there will be a kind of prioritization," Lina said. He said the Arroyo administration will source funds from the national treasury and from foreign financing institutions. Lina said a number of Islamic countries have already expressed willingness to help.

He said the three provinces will have to provide counterpart funds for the projects. Lina said major corporations could also pour in funds while investing in these areas. As soon as the socio-economic plans are done by the three provinces, government will embark on a roadshow presentation before the chambers of commerce in the country, he said.



June 14, 2001, Sun Star, Sayyafs a curse to Islam GMA,

MANILA -- Stressing her determination to "decimate" the Abu Sayyaf the soonest possible time, President Arroyo said there would be no let-up in the military offensive against the group. "The Abu Sayyaf is a plague to our race. A curse to their religion," she stressed.

Arroyo, who opened her weekly press conference with a statement, stressed her administration's priority to ensure the safety of the hostages despite the intensified pursuit operations against the bandits. "We will bring justice to the victims with the government continuing its duties armed with two objectives. First, continue the rescue without this resulting in the injury or death of a hostage and two, pursue the Abu Sayyaf until they are all annihilated or surrendered," she added.

Taking note of the bandits' behavior, Arroyo has vowed to reciprocate such attitude of "fire with fire and more." In her vow to sweep the entire kidnap-for-ransom group, the President has also warned residents in Basilan, may they be relatives or friends of the bandits, not aid them in any way. "I am warning the civilians who are helping the Abu Sayyaf. Those who are giving them refuge, food, arms, water or information, we will never forgive you, regardless if you are the relatives or friends, there is a punishment awaiting you," the President declared.

Brigadier General Edilberto Adan, Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) spokesman, said the beheaded man in Tipo-Tipo town was "Uztadz," and this all the more convinced the military that Peruvian-American hostage Guillermo Sobera is still alive.

Their belief that Sobero remains alive, Adan said, primarily rests on the absence of physical evidence that he was beheaded, according to the Abu Sayyaf spokesman's claim. "It is possible that Mr. Sobero is still alive. We are hopeful that he is still alive," Adan told reporters. Defense Secretary Angelo Reyes, meanwhile, appealed to Basilan residents not to lose their trust and confidence in the soldiers and policemen who continue to risk their lives to protect and fight for the rights of civilians. Reyes' call was in reaction to the statement made by religious leaders about their waning trust and confidence on the military's capability. "It is important that the people continue to trust its Armed Forces, because that's the only thing that nourishes them. The task in Basilan is a difficult task, we are not offering any excuses," Reyes said.

"We make mistakes but our soldiers are paying dearly for it with their lives so we ask that the people will not lose their faith and confidence in us because we are doing our best for the people, primarily with the people in Basilan," he added. In line with this, the President has already instructed Reyes and Interior Secretary Jose Lina Jr. to fly to Basilan not only to meet with the local leaders but also to personally check the conditions of the civilians in the province.

The President said that lapses recorded in the ongoing clashes did not decrease her support to members of the AFP and the PNP. "I have not lost my trust and confidence in them military and in the police. "If we really want to have a lasting solution we really need to have the civilian population very, very involved and even take the lead in many of the things we have to do," the President said.

Arroyo has likewise assured the foreign communities about her administration's non-stop attempt to secure their citizens visiting the Philippines. To date, her administration is already in the final stage of drafting an Executive Order that would embrace the concerned agencies' serious task of promoting the safety of the civilians - locals or foreigners alike.

The President's statement came a day after the Singaporean government called on the Arroyo administration to work for the sure protection of their citizens in the Philippines. The Singaporean government is getting alarmed over the series of abductions victimizing their citizens. The latest of which was businessman Roger Yeo who was kidnapped last June 1 and freed only after paying US$165,745.

Concerned government agencies, Adan said, are now drafting guidelines to be followed in support of President Arroyo's order to also go after the civilian supporters of the bandits. With the President's order, the military will now have a freer hand in addressing the case of the civilians involving themselves in Abu Sayyaf activities. "The military will now take some steps to prevent supplies and support from reaching these rebels, these bandits. But the details will have to be threshed out because unless we have the authority. We are operating (today) in a normal, peace and order type operations," Adan said.

The military claim the Abu Sayyaf normal force is only composed of a measly 1,200 members. The number, however, thickens each time the Abu Sayyaf releases fund for operations, and this is what is happening in Basilan and Sulu these days. (Sunnex)



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June 19, 2001, Sun Star Davao, 1 500 MNLFs storm Armm compound, Ben O. Tesiorna and Peng Aliño,

June 19, 2001, Sun Star, GMA vows no let up in war vs Sayyafs,

June 19, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Human rights abuses thrive where military police are,



June 25, 2001, Sun Star, Sobero is still alive MILF.txt



June 26, 2001, Sun Star Zamboanga, Number of displaced families continue to soar, by Bong Garcia,

June 26, 2001,Sun Star Davao, Peace pact lauded,

June 26, 2001, Sun Star, Soldier 4 Sayyafs wounded in clash.



June 29, 2001, Sun Star Davao, Indigenous people want separate state, by Allan Nawal,

June 29, 2001, Sun Star, MILF s presence delay attack on Abu,






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